5 tech products that is now obsolete

0
131
5 tech products that is now obsolete

In this article, you will get to see the five tech products that nobody ever thought would become obsolete.

However, due to technological advancement and newly developed tech products, the 5 tech products listed below have now become obsolete.

We call technologies obsolete when they are no longer in use due to the development of newer and more sophisticated alternatives.

5 Tech product that is now obsolete

Typewriters

The first commercial typewriters were introduced in 1874, but it was not until the mid-1880s that they became widely used in offices.

Except for personal handwritten correspondence, the machine was an indispensable tool for virtually all writing.

Professional writers, offices, business correspondence in private homes, and students all used it.

Typewriters, like every other outdated technology, have been replaced by faster computers. In Mumbai, India, the world’s last remaining manual typewriter manufacturer closed its doors for good in 2011.

banner ad

Film cameras

Joseph Nicéphore Niépce used the heliography technique to capture the world’s first photograph in 1826 or 1827.

The world of photography has changed since then. Years later, film cameras were invented, with reels of film that had to be taken to local shops to be processed into paper pictures.

Film cameras have become obsolete due to the rise of digital cameras. Anyone with a digital camera or a smartphone can now take photos instantly.

Canon announced in May 2018 that it had finally sold its last film camera, eight years after ceasing production.

Floppy Disks

Floppy disks were extremely popular in late-twentieth-century culture. In the 1970s, it was a type of data storage medium that first appeared.

The first type was an 8-inch floppy disk with a storage capacity of only 80 kilobytes. A 3.5-inch floppy disk with a storage capacity of 1.44 megabytes was the next type.

The storage capacity of floppy disks increased as their size shrank.

Data storage methods with much greater data storage capacity and data transfer speed, such as USB flash drives, memory cards, optical discs, and storage available through local computer networks and cloud storage, rendered the disks obsolete by the mid-2000s.

Landlines

Traditional telephone systems, such as landlines, are gradually becoming obsolete. Since Alexander Graham Bell’s first phone call to his assistant, Thomas Watson, in 1876, they had dominated for more than a century.

People have long since transitioned from the landline era to the mobile era, in which anyone with a cell phone can easily move around.

VHS (Video Home System)

VHS (Video Home System)

VHS, or Video Home System, used to be as big as DVDs are now. From the 1970s to the early 2000s, they were the preferred medium for home videos, and they could also be used to record videos.

With the introduction of the DVD in 2008, the popular VHS format was rendered obsolete. VHS was replaced by DVD as the new video technology for recording and distribution of films.

* BEST DEALS & OFFERS*

◊Become an Expert Cryptocurrency Trader and Investor With My Winning Master plan and strategies. Get a 1-7 days Course Live on Zoom with complete mentorship and first hand signals With 30% Off Original Price For Just 100 Slots--CLICK HERE

◊Get Free ₦1,000 plus 5% - 15% interests on savings and over 35% return on investments: Create a Free Account on PiggyVest --CLICK HERE

◊Do you want to make good money daily betting on your favorite soccer games?Join Betgaranteed Telegram channel for constant and steady Football winning --CLICK HERE

◊Register Your Business Name With CAC and Get it in less than 2 weeks--CLICK HERE

◊Grab Ultimate List of Over 100+ Companies That Pays You Up To $2500 To Blog and Post Online ( #3000 Only))- CLICK HERE
____________________________________________________________________
Previous articleTop 5 Best and Strong Android VPN in 2021
Next articleHow to Get Verified on Snapchat

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here